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Man with index finger pointed up Get to the Point
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Get to the Point!

Ryan Lochte’s Vocabulary Lesson for All of Us

By Theda C. Snyder

“I over-exaggerated.” It was impossible to miss the world’s derision for Ryan Lochte’s poor word choice. The Olympian was trying to explain his lies about how he found himself at the wrong end of a gun after a night of partying in Brazil.

Indeed, “over-“ is a prefix meaning excessive or excessively. But there is no such word as “over-exaggerate.” And yet, many words with this prefix seem as silly as Lochte’s grammar misstep. “Over-smooth” is an adjective, but it’s hard to imagine how a surface could be more smooth than just “smooth.” You could correctly call the witness who shoots off his mouth “over-talkative,” but doesn’t “talkative” make the point?

My dictionary includes a long list of verbs and adjectives which start with this prefix. Many are useful and concise: over-inflate, over-decorate, over-sweet. But others seem like a linguistic tautology; the sense of the prefix is already included in the word: over-teach, over-quick, over-grateful.

Lawyers can be over-enthusiastic when writing about their clients’ cases. “Get To The Point” has previously cautioned against over-use of “very.”

When you want to emphasize a point, you may be tempted to use an adjective or adverb which is redundant with its noun or verb, such as: thinking pensively, egregiously wrong, lavishly extravagant, querulously argumentative.

Good legal writing is concise. Choose verbs and nouns that pack the most meaning, and avoid superfluous modifiers. Don’t over-do it.

Illustration ©iStockPhoto.com

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Theda C. Snyder

Theda “Teddy” Snyder mediates workers compensation cases throughout California. She is also available for freelance writing assignments. Teddy has practiced in a variety of settings and frequently speaks and writes about settlements and the business of law. She is a Fellow of the College of Law Practice Management and the author of four ABA books, including “Women Rainmakers’ Best Marketing Tips, 3rd Edition” as well as “Personal Injury Case Evaluation” available on Amazon.com. Based in Los Angeles, Teddy can be found at WCMediator.com and on Twitter @WCMediator.

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